News

The paper details the functions of the team’s model-based flight control system, developed for the flexible winged test plane, build under the H2020 FLEXOP project.
On the 19th of November 2019, an aircraft with aeroelastically tailored wings flew in real environment for the first time in the world. The wings carbon fibre composite orientation is changing by the wind’s direction. The flight of the craft that was developed under the SZTAKI-lead international project FLEXOP was to test ease passive damping of the load on the wings. SZTAKI has also responsible for building and functioning the board aviation (electric flight) system, including sensors and batteries inside the wings, and the autopilot system’s software and hardware components. With these, the craft is viable for repeatable experiments to collect data.
Researchers of SZTAKI, Institute for Computer Science and Control, Hungary, will lead the international project FLiPASED (FLight Phase Adaptive Aero-Servo-Elastic aircraft Design) which intends to revolutionize aircraft wings through developing and testing the so called active-controlled wings.
The 'Flutter Free FLight Envelope eXpansion for ecOnomical Performance improvement' (FLEXOP) project is an EU H2020 project. It opens a complete new dimension for derivative aircraft design. In order to validate the different methods and tools developed in the project, a flight-test campaign will be carried out, in which the design and manufacturing of stiff wings, very flexible wings with active flutter control, as well as tailored wings for passive load alleviation will be verified.
„Integration of velocity and suspension control to enhance automated driving comfort in road vehicles”
The members of the delegation were Dr. Stephen D. O'Regan (Associate Director, Office of Naval Research, Prague Office), and Ms. Amanda Napier (Science Advisor, US Army RDECOM-Atlantic).
Between 29-30 Oct. 2018, the 4th Progress Meeting of VISION H2020 EU-Japan research project was held at our Institute. Our partners in this project are as follows: ONERA, University of Bristol, University of Exeter, Dassault Aviation, RICOH, JAXA, ENRI, Mitsubishi Space Software and University of Tokyo.
We take the opportunity and congratulate our colleague György Lipták, Research Fellow of the Systems and Control Lab. He had his viva on the 25 April at the Doctoral School of Information Sciences at the University of Pannonia. He successfully defended his thesis.
The FLEXOP consortium -- led by our Institute -- has developed an unmanned aerial vehicle platform to facilitate the study of aeroelastic behaviour of aircraft and test advanced control methods for the future generation of commercial aircraft.
With the authorship of Profs. G. Szederkényi and K. Hangos of the Systems and Control Lab, and A. Magyar (University of Pannonia), a book entitled ’Analysis and Control of Polynomial Dynamic Models with Biological Applications’ was published by the Academic Press the other day.
Attila Cs. Marosi and Róbert Lovas (of the Laboratory of Parallel and Distributed Systems) together with Ádám Kisari and Ernő K. Simonyi (of the Systems and Control Laboratory) won the Best Paper Award of the IEEE Future IoT 2018 Conference, which was held in Eger . The title of their article was 'Novel IoT Platform for the Era of Connected Cars'.
The Faculty of Transportation and Vehicle Engineering of Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME) is to launch an English-language graduate course in autonomous vehicle control engineering from September, state news wire MTI reported
Part-time researcher Sándor Molnár of the System and Control Lab successfully defended his DSc thesis.
Tamás Péni and Tamás Luspay, two members of Systems and Control Lab, and András Kovács, member of Research Laboratory on Engineering & Management Intelligence receive the János Bolyai Research Fellowship between 2017-2020.
Experience shows that a major part of the cost of system identification is associated with performing experiments on the plant in question. For dynamical systems, it has been shown that a careful design of the experiment can lead to significant cost reduction. These observations have prompted renewed interest in adaptive input design. A major advance in this area, providing a theoretical justification for a standard adaptive method, was published recently in the IEEE Trans. on Automatic Control by László Gerencsér and Håkan Hjalmarsson.

The paper entitled 'Parameter varying flutter suppression control for the BAH jet transport wing" written by B. Patartics, T. Luspay, T. Péni, B. Takarics , B. Vanek  and T. Kier  was shortlisted for the Best Interactive Paper Prize at the IFAC World Congress in Toulouse  (France).

The presenters in the Interactive Section were encouraged to emphasize their scientific contributions in vivo, i.e., by means of videos, simulations, demonstrations in  addition to usual slide-show. 

A successful R&D project that was launched in 2015 is to be completed in June 2017 by the project consortium. The project was funded by the Hungarian National Research, Development and Innovation Fund and it was coordinated by the Institute for Computer Science and Control (MTA SZTAKI). The technical objectives of the project were to define and implement a set of automated control functions for commercial vehicles.

The control of the key elements of transport (e.g., of vehicles and of vehicle platoons) is normally carried out in a hierarchical manner with the various elements of control targeting different layers of the hierarchy.

Successful presentation and technical demonstration of the R&D results concerning the aircraft sense and avoid system development was given to the American experts.

A research consortium of 8 European partners from industry (Airbus, Deimos Space), research establishments (DLR, MTA SZTAKI) and Universities (Bordeaux, Delft, Hull, Leicester) was established in July 2009 with funding from the European Union 7th Framework Program to address the challenge of the future sustainable aircraft: to be cleaner, quieter, smarter and more affordable.